Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie on Race

 

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie on Race

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie on Race…”We all wish it was not. But it’s a lie. I came from a country where race was not an issue; I did not think of myself as black and I only became black when I came to America.” Continue reading

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Race, Socioeconomics and Love Online

Race, Socioeconomics and Love Online

Race, socioeconomics and love online…yes! Most of us support interracial relationships… and the number of supporters keeps rising. So why is it that when it comes to online dating, fewer people are choosing mates who are outside their race? Why are online daters hesitant to date interracially despite studies showing growing support and growth in interracial relationships? Continue reading

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Virginia Highest in US for Black-White Marriage

Interracial wedding couple

Virginia ranks highest in U.S. for black-white marriage

By Denise M. Watson
The Virginian-Pilot
© March 17, 2012
Virginia ranks highest in U.S. for black-white marriage. When Andrew Bernard started chatting with Alissa Landry at the Bayside rec center where she worked, he didn’t notice her darker skin. He noticed that she was fun to talk to.

Continue reading

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Interracial Marriage for all Americans Pew Report

Interracial Marriage for all Americans Pew Report

The idea of interracial marriage for all Americans is catching on.

Marriage across racial and ethnic lines continues to be on the rise in the United States. The share of new marriages between spouses of a different race or ethnicity from each other increased to 15.1% in 2010, and the share of all current marriages that are either interracial or interethnic has reached an all-time high of 8.4%.

The upward trend of intermarriage is many decades old. In 1980, fewer than 7% of new marriages were intermarriages, less than half the share now. Among all marriages, the share of intermarriages in 1980 was about 3%.

Findings from a number of recent Pew research surveys show that just as intermarriage has become more common, public attitudes have become more accepting…

Read on at http://www.pewresearch.org/daily-number/intermarriage-on-the-rise-in-the-u-s/

 

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Transcending the Racial Divide in America

interracial discussion

Transcending the Racial Divide in America

…from an article about race consciousness by Charles Byrd

Attention to race is not an American invention, but it is an American obsession. From the great philosopher Baruch Spinoza to a collection of voices crying in the wilderness of dogmatic thinking and reaction, it is especially important that we start listening to the voice of reason re racism Continue reading

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Race in America…Under the Microsocope

ngozi adichie

Race in America…Under the Microsocope

By Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
Sunday, June 8, 2008

…a look at race in America…under the microsocope provided by world famous author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. Here is a brief biography taken from her website:

“Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie was born in Nigeria in 1977. She is the author of three novels, Purple Hibiscus(2003), Half of a Yellow Sun (2006), and Americanah (2013), of a short story collection, The Thing around Your Neck (2009).She has received numerous awards and distinctions, including the Orange Broadband Prize for Fiction (2007) and a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship (2008).”

Here are updates to the foregoing including recent works by Adichie:

2 August 2017BibliographyLinks and Awards sections updated. Chimamanda has recently published an essay about Albert Speer’s Inside the Third Reich, which can be accessed here.

24 May 2017BibliographyLinks and Awards sections updated.

7 April 2017Bibliography updated with a reference to the new Companion to Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, edited by Ernest N. Emenyonu. More information about the book can be found on the publisher’s website. A paperback edition is also available in Africa only.

15 March 2017Bibliography and Links updated following the publication of Chimamanda’s new book, Dear Ijeawele, or a Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions. About the issues raised by the author in her recent interview with Channel 4, see the clarifications that she provided on Facebook here and here.

“I was annoyed the first time an African American man called me “sister.” It was in a Brooklyn store, and I had recently arrived from Nigeria, a country where, thanks to the mosquitoes that kept British colonizers from settling, my skin color did not determine my identity, did not limit my dreams or my confidence. And so, although I grew up reading books about the baffling places where black people were treated badly for being black, race remained an exotic abstraction: It was Kunta Kinte.

Until that day in Brooklyn. To be called “sister” was to be black, and blackness was the very bottom of America’s pecking order. I did not want to be black…”

…for complete article 

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Interracial Marriage Increasing by Leaps and Bounds in America

From the Pew Report

The Rise of Intermarriage

Rates, Characteristics Vary by Race and Gender

February 16, 2012

Interracial marriage is a fact of life in the United States today. 
Whereas only about 1 in 33 Americans were married interracially in 1980,
1 in 12 are in an interracial marriage union today.
 

While the overall intermarriage rate has increased by 400% in little more
than a generation in the U.S., that rate is growing exponentially today.

 Some interesting aspects of this phenomenon are covered
in the following report; including “out-marrying” rates for both
 
African Americans and Asian Americans that show sharp differences
along gender lines.

The share of new marriages between spouses of a different race or ethnicity increased to 15.1 % in 2010, and the share of all current marriages that are either interracial or interethnic has reached an all-time high of 8.4%.

In 1980, just 3% of all marriages and less than 7% of all new marriages were across racial or ethnic lines. Both of those shares have more than doubled in the past three decades.

While newlyweds who “married out” between 2008 and 2010 are very similar to those who “married in,” judging by characteristics such as education, income and age, there are sharper differences among them based on the race, ethnicity and gender partnerships of the couples.

Just as intermarriage has become more common, public attitudes have become more accepting. More than four-in-ten (43%) Americans say that more people of different races marrying each other has been a change for the better in our society, while only about one-in-ten think it is a change for the worse.

 

to read the entire article go to http://pewresearch.org/pubs/2197/intermarriage-race-ethnicity-asians-whites-hispanics-blacks

 

 

 

 

 

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A Pill to Cure Racism?

pharmaceutical drugs

A Pill to Cure Racism?

A Pill to Cure Racism? by Eric Pfeiffer | The Sideshow – Thu, Mar 8, 2012

Propranolol (Image via WikiCommons)A commonly prescribed drug used to treat high blood pressure may have the unintended benefit of muting racist thoughts in those who take it.

A new Oxford University research study found that Propranolol, which works to combat high blood pressure, anxiety, migraines, and a number of heart ailments, affects the same part of the central nervous system that regulates subconscious attitudes on race.

“Implicit racial bias can occur even in people with a sincere belief in equality,” said Sylvia Terbeck, lead author of the study, which was published in the journal Psychopharmacology. “Given the key role that such implicit attitudes appear to play in discrimination against other ethnic groups, and the widespread use of Propranolol for medical purposes, our findings are also of considerable ethical interest.”

To read this article in its entirety go to:
http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/sideshow/feeling-racist-blood-pressure-pill-propranolol-may-open-223450211.html

 

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