Draconian Drug Sentences in America

just say no

 

Draconian drug sentences in America are now seen as a problem, not as a solution as it was a few generations back. Ill advised and ill begotten, the once-vaunted war on drugs has served as a vote-getting strategy that has helped to put opportunistic politicians in office while doing little to end the scourge of hard drugs in America. In fact, it might have worsened the situation more than anything else has.

Draconian Drug Sentences in America

By Dr. Sinclair Grey III
from kulturekritic.com

 America and its Draconian drug laws

First time drug offenders, often nonviolent youths, have been given stiff drug sentences for years now in an ill-conceived attempt on the part of conservative forces to ‘storm trooper” the problem of drug addiction and related crime, much – if not most – of it caused by this self same Draconian sentencing policy Continue reading

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Smart People Use Drugs?

IQ Chart

November 14th, 2011

06:30 PM ET
…from thechartblog.cnn.com

The “Just Say No” generation was often told by parents and teachers that intelligent people didn’t use drugs.   Turns out, the adults may have been wrong.

High IQ equals greater drug use

A new British study finds children with high IQs are more likely to use drugs as adults than people who score low on IQ tests as children.  The data come from the 1970 British Cohort Study, which has been following thousands of people over decades.  The kids’ IQs were tested at the ages of 5, 10 and 16.  The study also asked about drug use and looked at education and other socioeconomic factors.  Then when participants turned 30, they were asked whether they had used drugs such as marijuana, cocaine and heroin in the past year.

Researchers discovered men with high childhood IQs were up to two times more likely to use illegal drugs than their lower-scoring counterparts.  Girls with high IQs were up to three times more likely to use drugs as adults.

Marijuana among teens has downside

According to a study published in The Huffington Post:

“How’s this for peer pressure? Not only do the cool kids smoke pot, but it turns out the smart kids do, too.

We joke, of course. But a new study suggests that teens with high scores on academic exams were almost twice as likely as low-scoring peers to use cannabis persistently at ages 18 to 20. Smarter kids also were less likely than low scorers to smoke cigarettes, and more likely to drink.

Lest you consider this study permission to claim your youthful indiscretions as confirmation of genius, consider this: The researchers regard their findings as a warning against assuming that teens with poor academic performance are more likely to abuse substances than their peers. They also note that while high-achieving teens may eventually get into good universities and secure high-paying jobs, substance abuse can derail those promising futures. For instance, some evidence suggests that marijuana can have a harmful effect on developing brains, and alcohol use among minors is linked to a higher risk of fatal car collisions, accidental injuries, alcohol poisoning and suicide.”

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