Government by Coffee?

coffee maker #3

 

 

 

 

How much coffee is consumed these days? It is getting close to a half billion cups per year. Why not replace big government with government-by-coffee. Replace those austere chambers where catastrophic courses of action are suggested and wars declared with Starbucks-like coffee chambers, so that the great issues of the day can be decided in a cozy and fraternal atmosphere over a leisurely Cappuccino and toasted bagel rather than in great halls which so often serve as settings for policies based on the blood-and-iron approach to problem solving.

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Espresso machine buying guide

coffee maker #1

 

http://www.idrinkcoffee.com is a website that offers everything coffee to both private parties and businesses. Its product offerings range from commercial grade espresso machines and brewing equipment to juicers, blenders – in addition to coffee and tea from around the world Its tutorials are extremely informative and valuable for beginners, intermediate and advanced students/consumers of coffee and tea the following excerpt is from an article about choosing an espresso machine.

Choosing between Manual, Semi-Automatic or Super-Automatic

Purchasing an espresso machine can be a substantial investment and requires some important decisions. IDC is committed to helping you make the right choice to meet your needs, lifestyle and budget. We are here to answer any questions you may have or to make suggestions if required. Please review our buying guide below for some general considerations to keep in mind when choosing an espresso machine. Continue reading

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Make Good Espresso and Frothed Milk

Make Good Espresso and Frothed Milk
The following is an excerpt from an article at www.coffeebrewers.com..an excellent website that is all about coffee. This site offers a ton of really good coffee-making equipment for sale and interesting articles about all phases and aspects of coffee and coffee production:

There are many who enjoy a well-made (a “professionally made”) espresso, or latte, or cappuccino at home each morning. But there are a few practical problems with the scale of most home equipment. While large commercial machines will make high quality drinks in large quantities, it’s more difficult to make just one drink for yourself.
In this article, we’ll give you some tips to help you emulate the advantages of a large, commercial system to get similar results from your household equipment. Some of these tips will require using some additional tools and gadgets with your espresso machine to get professional results. But these are all relatively inexpensive, and will transform the (perhaps) uninteresting drinks you currently get from your machine into the kinds of coffee drinks that you’d pay several dollars for at a real coffee shop. Continue reading

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How to Make a Cafe Mocha at Home

cafe mocha

 

 How to make a cafe mocha at home

Explore: A Cafe Mocha is a delicious hot beverage made by combining chocolate, espresso and steamed milk. It is sometimes also called a Mocha or a Mocha Latte. Continue reading

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Coffee Fest 2014

By Marc Wortman
makegoodcoffee.com

 

Makegoodcoffee.com. is an invaluable resource for anyone who loves coffee and is looking for interesting and informative tutorials about the art and science of coffee making. There is also a steady stream of coffee and coffee equipment reviews as well as general reportage on ndustry news and events.

 

 

This past weekend, I attended the Coffee Fest show In Portland, Oregon.  I had attended this same show a couple years ago when it took place in Seattle.  This year, the72nd edition of Coffee Fest moved to Portland, and to Oregon for the first time in its history.

Read: Seattle Coffee Fest 2012

Coffee Fest is an industry trade show, primarily for coffee roasters and cafe managers.  The emphasis of the show is on how the business owner can grow their sales, so ironically, there’s less coffee at Coffee Fest than I would’ve expected.  The emphasis is definitely on keeping a coffee business current, but also on the different worlds that a coffee business can get into.

I didn’t take count, but it seemed that the largest business segment exhibiting at Coffee Fest was tea.  Many successful coffee business owners expand into offering a variety of teas.  I don’t mind tea, but I also don’t know enough about it to speak with exhibitors in this space.

 

Another large segment in exhibitors was coffee importers, and these were the people that I came mainly to see.  I’ve been shopping around for a coffee roaster, and I think I have the one I want picked out.  With that decision behind me, I’ll need larger quantities of green coffee than I’ve bought before, and I wanted to meet the importers that make that possible.  I was able to meet with sales people who work for these importers, and made some great contacts.

 

…Coffee Fest 2014

Another large segment in exhibitors was coffee importers, and these were the people that I came mainly to see.  I’ve been shopping around for a coffee roaster, and I think I have the one I want picked out.  With that decision behind me, I’ll need larger quantities of green coffee than I’ve bought before, and I wanted to meet the importers that make that possible.  I was able to meet with sales people who work for these importers, and made some great contacts.

…read more at makegoodcoffee.com.

For an interesting look at a coffee tasting at a local coffee roasting company, visit http://makegoodcoffee.com/coffee-talk/coffee-tasting-at-your-local-roaster/

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About the National Coffee Association

Coffee

A few words about the National Coffee Association

The National Coffee Association Is dedicated to coffee in all its forms, uses and manifestations. Its web site offers sections devoted to market research, government affairs, a knowledge bank, events, education and scientific affairs – all of which revolve around coffee.  The organizations holds a convention every year, Continue reading

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What is Espresso?

What is Espresso?
http://www.nationalespressoday.com/

Anatomy of Espresso
What is Espresso?

Contrary to popular belief, espresso is not a specific bean or roast level. Any bean or roast level can be used to make espresso. What makes espresso espresso is its brewing method, which is made by forcing pressurized hot water through finely ground coffee to create a concentrated coffee topped with a delicate foam, called a crema.

The crema should be thin and foamy with a golden-brown and sometimes slightly reddish color. The crema has a sweet flavor as it contains the espresso’s concentrated sugars and oils. The body is the middle layer and it is typically caramel-brown in color. The bottom of an espresso, known as the heart, should have a deep brown tone. The heart contains the bitterness that provides a balance to the sweetness of the crema.

While there is no universal standard in how to make the perfect espresso, it is often thought that the quality of the ultimate espresso comes from the four Ms:
Macinazione – correct grinding of the coffee bean
Macchina – the espresso machine
Miscela – the coffee blend
Mano – the skilled hand of the person making the coffee

 

The Origins of Espresso

Espresso made its debut in Italy in the early 20th century, at a time when coffee had already been a staple of Italian life for hundreds of years. Espresso lovers owe a debt of gratitude to Italy’s Luigi Bezzera, the owner of a manufacturing plant who set out to shorten the length of time it took to make a cup of coffee. It’s unclear whether he was motivated to speed up the brewing process out of frustration over how long it took for him to make his morning coffee or whether he was motivated by a desire to shorten  his employees’ coffee breaks.

In any case, Bezzera discovered that adding steam pressure to the process produced a stronger and more robust cup of coffee. The machine used in this new quick-brew process was named the Fast Coffee Machine. The beverage produced by this machine would become known as espresso – or “fast” in Italian. In the end, Signore Bezzera wasn’t nearly as talented at marketing and sales as he was at engineering. In 1905, Desidero Pavoni purchased the rights to the machine from Bezzera and took out a patent on it. It is largely due to Pavoni’s marketing expertise that espresso grew in popularity.

In the early 1940s, Achille Gaggia’s piston-based machine greatly enhanced the quality of espresso by eliminating the burnt flavor and making it  thicker. Used commercially at first, Gaggia’s and other espresso machines gradually became available for use at home.

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How Good is the Bodum Electric French Press

—Ed Perratore

This is a review of the Bodum Electric French Press

In the ongoing quest to brew a perfect cup of coffee at home, some manufacturers are making electric coffeemakers that mimic the manual French press machines preferred by many aficionados. But leave it to Bodum—a long-time player in traditional French presses—to come out with a true electric French-press coffeemaker, complete with the popular plunger. We just added it to our Ratings of coffeemakers of this type.

Cleverly, the Bodum Bistro Electric French Press 11462, $60, doesn’t automate the entire process. It leaves the important last step, pushing down the plunger, for purists.  Here’s how it works: Fill the reservoir on the right-side of the machine with up to 17 ounces of water, then add ground coffee to the carafe on the left and snap on the lid. Once the hot water has soaked the grounds, remove the carafe from the warming plate and replace the lid with another that includes a built-in plunger. After four minutes of steeping time, gently push the plunger down to trap the grounds prior to pouring.

You might like the way the coffee tastes, and we found the pitcher balanced and easy to hold. But we weren’t enamored with the rest of the process. Both lids required aligning tabs with slots to keep them in place and we needed to wiggle the pitcher around to get it off the warming plate. And it’s not exactly a cinch to clean. The Bodum comes in a number of bright colors including the lime green one we tested, red, white, and black.

Read more at http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/news/2013/12/bodum-bistro-is-a-true-electric-french-press-coffeemaker/index.htm

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Arabica versus Robusta the Conversation Continues

 

Arabica vs. Robusta the conversation continues

by Kenneth Davids
posted in coffeereview.com

Need a quick hit of caffeine? Then make your next cup of coffee Robusta. It has twice as much caffeine as Arabica! Arabica beans are the Champagne of  coffee, and are in danger today because of global warming. They do best in sub-tropical conditions and need more altitude than their hardier cousins in Robusta Land. Arabica bushes are quite sensitive to climate and pests and give off a much more delicate aroma than Robusta beans. Supermarket coffees go heavy on Robusta, while Arabica is the stuff of gourmet blends. Arabica is sweet and fruity, Robusta is…well, robusta! Here is an article that contains interesting information about the Arabica versus Robusta issue.

. I’m here in El Salvador for “Let’s Talk Coffee,” a yearly meeting of mostly small-holding coffee producers, roasters, importer and exporters, and development agencies. It’s sponsored by Sustainable Harvest, a long-time pioneering American importer of cooperative and small-producer coffees.

I came here in part to deliver a presentation on Robusta coffees. It was part of a string of presentations and cuppings focused on exploring Robusta in a specialty coffee context. Conversations on Robusta are increasingly urgent in specialty coffee events for several reasons, all of them at bottom pushed by anxiety about the impact of global warming on Arabica production, particularly production of lower elevation Arabicas. Arabica is a very fussy plant in respect to temperatures, and as global temperatures rise more and more regions of Arabica production are being stressed by changes in rainfall patterns, higher temperatures, and intensified pest infestations like the latest leaf rust outbreak here in Central America. Robusta, of course, grows at a much wider range of elevations (though it cups best when grown at higher elevations) and is much hardier than Arabica.

Read more at

 

 

Arabica vs. Robusta: the conversation continues

by Kenneth Davids

Need a quick hit of caffeine? Then make your next cup of coffee Robusta. It has twice as much caffeine as Arabica! Arabica beans are the Champagne of  coffee, and are in danger today because of global warming. They do best in sub-tropical conditions and need more altitude than their hardier cousins in Robusta Land. Arabica bushes are quite sensitive to climate and pests and give off a much more delicate aroma than Robusta beans. Supermarket coffees go heavy on Robusta, while Arabica is the stuff of gourmet blends. Arabica is sweet and fruity, Robusta is…well, robusta!

. I’m here in El Salvador for “Let’s Talk Coffee,” a yearly meeting of mostly small-holding coffee producers, roasters, importer and exporters, and development agencies. It’s sponsored by Sustainable Harvest, a long-time pioneering American importer of cooperative and small-producer coffees.

 I came here in part to deliver a presentation on Robusta coffees. It was part of a string of presentations and cuppings focused on exploring Robusta in a specialty coffee context. Conversations on Robusta are increasingly urgent in specialty coffee events for several reasons, all of them at bottom pushed by anxiety about the impact of global warming on Arabica production, particularly production of lower elevation Arabicas. Arabica is a very fussy plant in respect to temperatures, and as global temperatures rise more and more regions of Arabica production are being stressed by changes in rainfall patterns, higher temperatures, and intensified pest infestations like the latest leaf rust outbreak here in Central America. Robusta, of course, grows at a much wider range of elevations (though it cups best when grown at higher elevations) and is much hardier than Arabica.

Read more at

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