Your Need to Daydream

The MindDon’t ignore your need to daydream.
Daydreaming puts you in the best company!
Albert Einstein was 16 years old when he first flirted with the idea of special relativity. Continue reading

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Metacognition

 

metacognition

Metacognition is one of the latest buzz words in educational psychology, but what exactly is metacognition? The length and abstract nature of the word makes it sound intimidating, yet its not as daunting a concept as it might seem. Continue reading

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Education in America Today

Education in America Today

Education in America Today

“Education is at the heart of America’s Crisis
– Michael Dukakis, unsuccessful Democratic candidate in the 1988 United States presidential race. Continue reading

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John Chambers on lifelong learning

Learning Today

John Chambers on lifelong learning 

John Chambers counsels the Class of 2013 to prepare for lifelong learning

Posted to the Mercury News 04/22/2013 05:59:14 AM PDT

For those of us old enough to remember when electric typewriters were the next big thing, it’s been an exciting – and oftentimes bumpy –  ride from the age of  mainframe computers and transistor radios to the era of smartphones and all-things-digital. Let us not forget, counsels John Chambers to the Class of 2013, that the Digital Age, for all its ease-of-use and never-ending gadgetry, is also the age of lifelong learning. In order to survive and thrive in this New Computer Age, we must be ready to accept its chief demand – that we never stop learning.

While the Class of 2013 has been in school, and since the introduction of the iPhone, more than 500,000 apps-related jobs have been created. Smartphones have driven a culture of “Innovation Ready” individuals who have rapidly seized the opportunity that these devices have presented. The Class of 2013 must be “innovation ready” to survive and thrive in an economy where lightning-speed change is a matter of course. You are the first to go through college relying on phone apps to obtain class schedules, rent textbooks, join lectures, do research, and find wi-fi hotspots. In this, you have demonstrated your ability to adapt and learn how to use technology to get your work do

You will also be challenged to adapt to a changing workplace — a dynamic and ever-evolving environment where the ability to think critically and move quickly is paramount. For you, who have been raised in a digital world, the workforce will seem normal, while for my generation, we have struggled to adapt, given that our pre-digital schooling consisted of a notepad, pencil and a typewriter.

read more at http://www.mercurynews.com/opinion/ci_23055838/john-chambers-memo-2013-college-graduates-never-stop

 

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Underfunding and the US Education Crisis

Underfunding is a key component of the US education crisis.

The U.S. education system is slipping behind other nations, and the widening achievement gap between rich and poor students is threatening the country’s global competitiveness, according to a new report from the Council on Foreign Relations.

The report, titled “Renewing America Progress Report and Scorecard,” lays blame at the fact school spending is distributed unequally in the United States.

While the U.S. funds its schools from property taxes on the local community — which often means more money goes to schools in high-income areas where homes are worth the most — most other developed nations divide school funding centrally by enrollment, i.e. the money is allocated evenly on a per-head basis.

“The real scourge of the U.S. education system — and its greatest competitive weakness — is the deep and growing achievement gap between socioeconomic groups that begins early and lasts through a student’s academic career,” said Rebecca Strauss, one of the report’s authors.
Read more at http://www.moneynews.com/Economy/education-US-school-spend/2013/06/21/id/511136?s=al&promo_code=13E80-1#ixzz2X4obULnr

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Facts about Home schooling

There is a movement taking place in America to take back the mind of our children.
The crisis in organized education continues to worsen, alternatives are more and more appealing.
We are in the new digital age in which education – and especially teaching young minds how to think as much as the teaching of specific subjects – does not merely give one a “leg up” in the struggle to survive, but is an absolute necessity. This is the exciting practice called home schooling.

Homeschooling – that is, parent-led home-based education – is an age-old traditional educational practice that a decade ago appeared to be cutting-edge and “alternative” but is now bordering on “mainstream” in the United States. It may be the fastest-growing form of education in the United States. Home-based education is also growing around the world in many other nations (e.g., Australia, Canada, Hungary, Japan, Kenya, and the United Kingdom).

· There are about 2.04 million home-educated students in the United States. There were an estimated 1.73 to 2.35 million children (in grades K to 12) home educated during the spring of 2010 in the United States. It appears the homeschool population is continuing to grow (at an estimated 2% to 8% per annum over the past few years).
Homeschooling – that is, parent-led home-based education – is an age-old traditional educational practice that a decade ago appeared to be cutting-edge and “alternative” but is now bordering on “mainstream” in the United States. It may be the fastest-growing form of education in the United States. Home-based education is also growing around the world in many other nations (e.g., Australia, Canada, Hungary, Japan, Kenya, and the United Kingdom).

· There are about 2.04 million home-educated students in the United States. There were an estimated 1.73 to 2.35 million children (in grades K to 12) home educated during the spring of 2010 in the United States. It appears the homeschool population is continuing to grow (at an estimated 2% to 8% per annum over the past few years).

· Families engaged in home-based education are not dependent on public, tax-funded resources for their children’s education. The finances associated with their homeschooling likely represent over $16 billion that American taxpayers do not have to spend since these children are not in public schools

· Homeschooling is quickly growing in popularity among minorities. About 15% of homeschool families are non-white/nonHispanic (i.e., not white/Anglo).
For the rest of the article go to: http://www.nheri.org/research/research-facts-on-homeschooling.html

National Home Education Research Institute (NHERI)
Copyright © 2011 by Brian D. Ray

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The Educational Crisis in America part II

education

Education in America

Education in America is in a state of emergency.

The 1988 Democrat presidential candidate Michael Dukakis said that the awful state of education in America was at the heart of the America’s crisis at that time. To paraphrase another source…Al Qaida itself would be hard pressed to carry out the long term and unrelenting demoralization and destruction of American minds and spirits that takes place in schools and schoolyards in the United States on a daily basis.
Private education?
The way it is now?
So we can turn out an even greater number of button-downed and Ivy-educated Hedge Funders?
Whatever the answer is, we better do it now.
Maybe an early diet of critical thinking starting at age 5 or 6 with an equal emphasis on left- and right-brain development.
Let us offer effective training in mathematics for everyone, even if it means we drop homecoming and pep rallies – or at least fund these activities with extracurricular donations.
How about a required philosophy class for high school seniors to keep us from turning into robots.
Basically, what we’re talking about here is getting back to a core curriculum of readin’, writin’ and arithmetic. Oh yeah…and thinking. Social skills? How about teaching grade school kids how to work together by giving them actual work to do.
All of them.
That way we they can learn and perfect techniques of problem solving, hone various technical skills and learn the kind of cooperation that is essential to any well-oiled business endeavor.
If we have to call in Indians or Japanese or Germans to help us achieve this goal than so be it and let us count ourselves lucky to have such good teachers.
Let the football stars find their own way to gridiron glory after school and on a volunteer basis. Their parents can pay for it all out of their own pockets should they so desire.
On site tutors as well as traditional teachers; a “hub ‘n spoke” system with computer hardware and live teachers housed in regional center with online access to same.

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Advice on How to Succeed from Neil deGrasse Tyson

 

Neil deGrasse TysonAdvice on How to Succeed from Neil deGrasse Tyson. Neil deGrasse Tyson is often approached by admirers with requests for advice on how they can be as accomplished and as successful as he is. Dr. Tyson is, in fact, a well rounded man; having experienced the adrenaline-rich challenges of a high school wrestling mat before going on to Harvard University. Continue reading

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